The Family Law Source Logo


Providing compassionate representation to families who are broken and hurting.

In order to help you more quickly, fill out the form or call us today: (727) 372-0465.

The Family Law Source Logo


Providing compassionate representation to families who are broken and hurting.

In order to help you more quickly, fill out the form or call us today: (727) 372-0465.

The Family Law Source Logo


Providing compassionate representation to families who are broken and hurting.

In order to help you more quickly, fill out the form or call us today: (727) 372-0465.

Adoption and Termination of Parental Rights

Adoption is a legal process by which a child becomes part of a family other than the one s/he was born into.

Adoption is a serious matter for all concerned because it permanently severs the ties to one or both of the birth parents and relatives of the birth parents.  The adoptive parent(s) will be legally responsible for providing the child with the care and guidance necessary in life that will determine the kind of adult he or she will become. To the birth parent, adoption usually means relinquishing the child forever without the privilege of seeing the child or being otherwise involved in the child’s life. However in some types of adoptions which are referred to as open adoptions, birth parents retain the right to communicate or visit the child. Additionally, the birth parent(s) are no longer responsible for the financial support of the child. To the adoptive parents, adoption means providing for and undertaking the care of a child to whom they will have the same obligations to as a child naturally born to them.

An adult may also be adopted. The procedure for adults is similar but considerably easier because consent of birth parents and termination of parental rights is not necessary.
Single adults, as well as married couples, may adopt. A stepparent may adopt his or her spouse’s children. Recently, the Third District Court of Appeal ruled that the statutory ban prohibiting homosexuals from adopting a child is unconstitutional. The Florida Supreme Court has not reviewed this decision.A person may not be prohibited from adopting solely because of a physical disability unless it is determined that the disability renders the person incapable of being an effective parent.  Additional information relating to adoption can be found on the Florida Bar website under the consumer section. 

The Family Law Source